Featured Event:
Language and the (Dis)organization of Mind


Language and the (Dis)organization of Mind

September 17, 2016
3pm – 5pm
Temple University Center City Campus, Room 322
15th and Market Streets


Speaker:
Wolfram Hinzen (Universitat Pompeu Fabra, FIDMAG Germanes Hospitalaries Research Foundation, and Universitat de Barcelona) Paper Title: "Reference across Pathologies: A New Linguistic Lens on Disorders of Thought" Abstract:
According to a linguistic tradition identified here as ‘Cartesian’, thought is independent of language. Rather than representing the configurator of a human-specific mind, language is relegated to an expressive system dedicated to the communication of an independently constituted thought process. Pursuing an alternative ‘un-Cartesian’ vision here, which regards human-specific thought and language as intrinsically linked, I review clinical language patterns in two populations with major cognitive disorders, autism spectrum conditions and schizophrenia, with a view to how language might illuminate psychopathology and vice versa. One universal linguistic function is reference: we cannot utter sentences without referring to persons, objects, and events, based on lexicalized concepts that provide descriptions of these referents. Reference in this sense takes a number of human-specific forms that systematically co-vary with forms of grammatical organization. It also proves to be highly vulnerable across major cognitive disorders. Grammar is thereby correlated with a central cognitive function that mediates forms of thought and selfhood critical to rational health. In this way, clinical linguistic and cognitive diversity provides a new window into the foundational question of the thought-language relationship and the cognitive significance of grammar. For more information contact David Wolfsdorf: dwolfsdo@temple.edu

2016-17 Program

The GPPC is pleased to announce its 2016-17 program of events. All GPPC events are open to the public and, except where otherwise noted, free of charge.

Calendar of Events

Click on any of the following events for more information.

SEPTEMBER 2016
Language and the (Dis)organization of Mind - September 17, 2016
OCTOBER 2016
GPPC Public Issues Forum: Refugee Rights & State Responsibilities - October 14, 2016

Bryn Mawr and Penn - Perceptual Learning - Fall 2016

NOVEMBER 2016
Penn Reasons and Foundations of Epistemology Conference - November 11-12, 2016
FEBRUARY 2017
Undergraduate Philosophy Conference - TBD

Author Meets Critics: Jill Stauffer, Ethical Loneliness: The Injustice of Not Being Heard - February 25, 2017

MARCH 2017
The New Materialisms: Emergence or Pan-psychism? - March 25, 2017

Philosophy on Film Series 2017 - TBD

3rd Annual Penn-MAP Non-western Philosophy Conference: Global Feminisms - March 24-25, 2017

APRIL 2017
2nd Annual Philosophy and Engagement Conference - April 7-9, 2017
Please also note our ongoing Philosophy Discussion Groups:

Philosophy Discussion Groups
Asian and Comparative Philosophy Discussion Group - West Chester University
History & Philosophy of Science Reading Group - Consortium for the History of Science
Philosophy of Religi­on Reading Group - Saint Joseph's University
Philadelphia Philosophy of Psychiatry Working Group - Location TBD

More information on these is available under Discussion Groups and in periodic updates on the home page.

Lloyd Gerson on Platonism v. Naturalism


Lloyd Gerson on Platonism v. Naturalism

April 22-23, 2016
Temple University
Philadelphia, PA


Friday, April 22
3pm - 5pm
"'Socrates' 'Autobiography' in Plato's Phaedo: An Epitome of Platonism"
Lecture by Lloyd Gerson (University of Toronto)
Temple University - Main Campus
Anderson Hall 821
Women's Studies Lounge
Directions:
by train: Take SEPTA Regional Rail to Temple University Station. Walk west on Berks St. to Anderson Hall. Take elevatore to Women's Study Lounge on 8th floor.
by car: There is parking at the Montgomery Ave Parking Garage next to Anderson Hall.

A map of the main campus: https://temple.edu/maps-and-directions Anderson Hall is Building #2 at the corner of 11th and Berks Sts.

Saturday, April 23
3pm - 5:45pm
Discussion of Lloyd Gerson's paper "Platonism v. Naturalism"
comments by Danielle MacBeth, followed by open discussion
Seminar on Platonism v. Naturalism
Temple University - Center City Campus
1515 Market Street
Room 421
Directions:
by train: Take SEPTA subway to City Hall Station or regional rail to Suburban Station, where Temple University's Cener City building is located.
by car: There are two parking lots nearby: Laz Parking (1500 Market St., entrance on 16th near Ranstead St.) and Parkway (1700 Market St.).

The Saturday event is a read ahead event. The paper is available for download: Platonism Versus Naturalism (PDF).

Note that attendance at the Saturday event does not presupppose attendance at the Friday event.

Events are free and open to the public

For more information please contact David Wolfsdorf, dwolfsdo@temple.edu.

The Ethics of Bodily Commodification


The Ethics of Bodily Commodification

Saturday, April 2, 2016
The College of New Jersey
Ewing, NJ


Keynote Speakers: Mark J. Cherry (St Edwards University)
Samuel Kerstein (University of Maryland)
Download FULL PROGRAM (Word doc file).

For more information please contact James Stacey Taylor, jtaylor@tcnj.edu.

Blessed Are the Tolerant: Religion, Pluralism, & Virtue


Blessed Are the Tolerant:
Religion, Pluralism, and Virtue

Saturday, March 19, 2016
1:00pm - 5:00pm
Dunleavy Room, Union Building
La Salle University
1900 W. Olney Avenue
Philadelphia, PA


Program:
"Tolerance Troubles: Virtue, Vice, or Craft?"
Speaker: John Bowlin (Princeton Theological Seminary)
Respondent: Matthew Puffer (Villanova University)

"Political Freedom as an Islamic Value"
David Decosimo (Boston University)
Respondent: Isra Yazicioglu (St Joseph's University)
A panel discussion with Q&A follows the two talks.

The La Salle Union is #48 on the campus map (PDF): http://www.lasalle.edu/campusmap/pdf/printer_friendly.pdf

La Salle University is accessible by public transit via the Broad Street Subway (Olney Transportation Center), the Wister Station on regional rail, and the 26 and 18 SEPTA bus routes. There is free parking available on the street and in lots G and J1.

Schedule:

1pm

Introductions

1:20pm - 2:20pm

"Tolerance Troubles: Virtue, Vice, or Craft?"

Speaker: John Bowlin (Princeton Theological Seminary)

Respondent: Matthew Puffer (Villanova University)

2:45pm - 3:45pm

"Political Freedom as an Islamic Value"

 Speaker: David Decosimo (Boston University)

Respondent: Isra Yazicioglu (St Joseph's University)

4pm - 5pm
Panel discussion for Q&A

The symposium will be held in the Dunleavy Room, Union Building, 3rd Floor. There will be signage to direct visitors.


John R. Bowlin is the Robert L. Stuart Associate Professor of Philosophy and Christian Ethics at Princeton Theological Seminary, where he works on Christian ethics, moral philosophy, social ethics, and the history of moral theology. He is the author of Contingency & Fortune in Aquinas's Ethics (Cambridge, 1999) and the forthcoming Tolerance among the Virtues (Princeton, 2016).

David Decosimo is assistant professor of theology at Boston University where he works on ethics, religion and politics, philosophy of religion, and Christianity and Islam. He is the author of the Manfred Lautenschlaeger award-winning Ethics as a Work of Charity: Thomas Aquinas and Pagan Virtue (Stanford, 2014) and the forthcoming Four Tasks of Christian Ethics.

Matthew Puffer is currently Catherine of Siena Fellow at Villanova University. He works on theological ethics with an interest in rival versions of the imago dei and human dignity and their implications for ethics. He will respond to Bowlin's talk on "Tolerance Troubles".

Isra Yazicioglu is associate professor of Islamic studies at St. Joseph’s University. She works on interpretation of scripture in the contemporary age, Islamic theology, and faith, reason and science. She will respond to Decosimo's talk on "Political Freedom as an Islamic Value".


For more information please contact S. Joel Garver, garver@lasalle.edu.

Call for Papers: Undergraduate Conference


The 2016 Greater Philadelphia Philosophy
Consortium Undergraduate Conference

presented by the Drexel University Department of English & Philosophy
and College of Arts & Sciences

9:00am to 5:00pm
Saturday, February 20, 2016
Macalister Hall 2020
Chestnut and 33rd Streets
Drexel University
Philadelphia PA, 19104

Undergraduates are invited to submit philosophical essays suitable for a fifteen to twenty minute presentation on any topic to be followed by commentary and discussion. Papers must not exceed 2,500 words or 10 pages, double-spaced, and must be prepared for blind review. Reviewers will include Philosophy faculty and undergraduate Philosophy majors. The top eight submissions will be read at the conference and published in Fresh Philosophy, the undergraduate philosophy blog/journal of the GPPC (http://www.freshphilosophy.com/).

Please send your submission by email attachment as an electronic file in .doc or .rtf format to Peter Amato at peterama@drexel.edu. The deadline for submissions is Sunday, December 13, 2015. Notification of accepted papers wil be sent by Monday, February 1, 2016.

Commentators are needed to present brief remarks following each paper. If you are interested in being a commentator, whether or not you intend to submit a paper, let us know. For further information email Peter Amato at peterama@drexel.edu or download an informational PDF.

GPPC Public Issues Forum: Philosophy & Urban Affairs


This Saturday, 24 October 2015, the GPPC will host its annual Public Issues Forum:

GPPC Public Issues Forum: Philosophy & Urban Affairs


The Greater Philadelphia Philosophy Consortium announces:

Public Issues Forum:
Philosophy and Urban Affairs

Saturday, October 24, 2015
2:00pm
Free Library of Philadelphia - Central Branch
Room 108
19th and Vine Streets
Philadelphia, PA


Free and Open to the Public.
Speakers: Paul Badger (Badger Group)
Jay Johnson (Wynnefield Residents Association)
Anne Fadullon (Dale Corporation)
Matthew Ruben (Northern Liberties Neighbors Association)

For more information please contact Andrew Payne, apayne@sju.edu.

Author Meets Critics: Macbeth, Realizing Reason


Author Meets Critics:
Danielle Macbeth, Realizing Reason: A Narrative of Truth and Knowing

Saturday, September 19
1:00pm - 5:00pm
The Bryn Mawr Room of the Dining Center
Haverford College
Haverford, PA

Speakers: Emily Grosholz (Penn State University)
Alan Baker (Swarthmore College)
David Wolfsdorf (Temple University)
Respondent: Danielle Macbeth (Haverford College)
Contact: Krista Murphy, kmurphy@haverford.edu

2015-16 Discussion Groups

The GPPC sponsors the following discussion groups:

Asian and Comparative Philosophy Discussion Group
Third Wednesday of the month
5:30pm - 7:00pm
Anderson Hall 322
West Chester University
725 S. Church Street
West Chester, PA 19383

Book Details:
Mark Siderits, Buddhism as Philosophy: An Introduction
(Hackett Publishing, 2007)

Contact:
Charlotte Moore cmoore@wcupa.edu.

History and Philosophy of Science Discussion Group
Meets on the 2nd Wednesday of the month to discuss a colleague’s work in progress or to discuss readings that are of particular interest to participants.

6:15pm - 7:45pm
Consortium for the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine
431 Chestnut Street
Philadelphia, PA 19106

Contact:
Miriam Solomon, Temple University, msolomon@temple.edu or Gary Hatfield, University of Pennsylvania, hatfield@sas.upenn.edu.

For more information visit History and Philosophy of Science.

Philosophy of Religion Discussion Group
Meets on the 2nd Wednesday of each month, 7:30pm - 9:30pm
Greaton Room
Barbelin-Lonergan Building, 116
Saint Joseph’s University

Dates:
9/9, 10/14, 11/11, 12/9

Book Details:
Fall 2015:
Dominique Janicaud, et al, Phenomenology and the "Theological Turn": The French Debate
(Fordham University Press, 2001)

Contact:
Joseph Godfrey, Saint Joseph’s University, jgodfrey@sju.edu

Philadelphia Philosophy of Psychiatry Working Group
Meets about once a month to discuss publications in philosophy of psychiatry and works in progress by group members.

Saturdays, 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Dates: TBD
Location: TBD

Contact:
Ginger Hoffman, St. Joseph's University, ginger.hoffman@sju.edu.

Work in Progress in Epistemology
Check main page for meeting times.
Papazian, Room 325
Swarthmore College
Swarthmore, PA 19081

Contact:
Peter Bauman, Department of Philosophy, Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, PA 19081, pbauman1@swarthmore.edu or phone: 610.328.8433.

Email or call for confirmation, more information and directions to the meeting place and information for subsequent discussion meetings.

Nietzsche's Birth of Tragedy


Nietzsche's Birth of Tragedy:
Philosophy, Theater, Music

Friday - Saturday, April 29-30, 2016
Temple University - Center City Campus
1515 Market Street
Philadelphia, PA


Speakers: Joshua Billings (Yale University)
Maudemarie Clark (University of California, Riverside)
Marcia Ferguson (University of Pennsylvania)
Michael Forster (Universit├Ąt Bonn)
Mark Franko (Temple University)
Kristin Gjesdal (Temple University)
Andrew Huddleston (University of London)
Thomas Stern (University College, London)
Tamsin Shaw (New York University)

For more information please contact Kristin Gjesdal, kgjesdal@temple.edu.

Lloyd Gerson on Platonism v. Naturalism


Lloyd Gerson on Platonism v. Naturalism

April 22-23, 2016
Temple University
Philadelphia, PA


Friday, April 22 - 3:00pm Lecture by Lloyd Gerson (University of Toronto)
Temple University - Main Campus
Anderson Hall, 8th Floor
Women's Studies Lounge

Saturday, April 23 - 3:00pm Seminar on Platonism v. Naturalism
Temple University - Center City Campus
1515 Market Street

For more information please contact David Wolfsdorf, dwolfsdo@temple.edu.